2013, Volume 9, Issue 4

Association of muscle-specific creatine kinase (CKM) gene polymorphism with combat athlete status in Polish and Russian cohorts



Paweł Cięszczyk1, Ildus Ahmetov2, Agata Leońska-Duniec3, Olga Fedotovskaya4, Jerzy Eider5, Waldemar Moska6, Stanisław Sawczyn6, Marek Sawczuk7, Zbigniew Czubek6, Nijole Jascaniene8, Małgorzata Żychowska6, Agnieszka Maciejewska-Karłowska5, Krzysztof Ficek5

1Academy of Physical Education and Sport, Department of Tourism and Recreation, Gdansk, University of Szczecin, Department of Physical Culture and Health Promotion, Szczecin, Poland
2Sport Technology Education Research Laboratory, Volga Region State Academy of Physical Culture, Sport and Tourism, Kazan, 5 Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, Kazan State Medical University, Kazan, Sports Genetics Laboratory, St Petersburg Research Institute of Physical Culture, St Petersburg, Russia
3Academy of Physical Education and Sport, Department of Tourism and Recreation, Gdans, University of Szczecin, Department of Physical Culture and Health Promotion, Szczecin, Poland
4Sports Genetics Laboratory, St Petersburg Research Institute of Physical Culture, St. Petersburg, Russia
5University of Szczecin, Department of Physical Culture and Health Promotion, Szczecin, Poland
6 Academy of Physical Education and Sport, Department of Tourism and Recreation, Gdansk, Poland
7University of Szczecin, Department of Physical Culture and Health Promotion
8Vilnius Pedagogical University, Vilnius, Lithuania


Author for correspondence: Jerzy Eider; University of Szczecin, Department of Physical Culture and Health Promotion, Szczecin, Poland


Full text

Abstract

Background and Study Aim: Combat sports are characterized by the involvement of both aerobic and anaerobic metabolic pathways in which the effort is of intermittent characteristics and explosive type of movements are repeated over time at high intensity. The A/G polymorphism (rs8111989) of the muscle specific creatine kinase (CKM) gene, encoding the protein which plays a key role in energy homeostasis of muscle cells, has been associated with physical performance. Specifically, the CKM G allele has been reported to be linked with power athlete status, whilst the CKM A allele has been significantly over-represented in endurance athletes. The aim of our study was to investigate the association between the CKM A/G polymorphism and combat athlete status in Polish and Russian cohorts.
Material and Methods: The study was carried out in 159 combat athletes and 1512 sedentary individuals from Poland and Russia. DNA was extracted from buccal cells donated by the subjects and genotyping was carried out using PCR based methods.
Results: We found that the frequency of the CKM G allele was significantly higher in the combined cohort of Polish and Russian athletes compared with controls (41.2 vs. 35.6%, P = 0.047).
Conclusions: The results suggest that the CKM gene is associated with combat athlete status in Polish and Russian populations. Although more replication studies are needed, the preliminary data suggest an opportunity to use the analysis of CKM polymorphism along with other gene variations and standard phenotypic assessment in combat sports selection.


Key words: ckm, gene polymorphism, physical performance