2006, Volume 2, Issue 1

Imitative forms of movement as a way of counteracting physical passivity of a contemporary man



Władysław Pańczyk1, Wojciech J. Cynarski2

1Faculty of Physical Education, University of Rzeszów, Academy of Physical Education in Warsaw, Biala Podlaska branch, Poland
2Faculty of Physical Education, University of Rzeszów, and Committee of Scientific Research, Idōkan Poland Association, Rzeszów, Poland


Author for correspondence: Wojciech J. Cynarski; Faculty of Physical Education, University of Rzeszów, and Committee of Scientific Research, Idōkan Poland Association, Rzeszów, Poland; email: sp_walki[at]univ.rzeszow.pl


Full text

Abstract

Common reception of post-modern mass culture and consumer civilisation in Poland has its very dangerous, delayed effect. Life based on this civilisation pattern does not help fulfil the needs for physical activity and work, which are very important for young organism’s health and psychophysical development. Observation of the realisation of contemporary school aims confirms that consumer patterns are followed. School physical education – the only education responsible for pupils’ somatic development and health – despite growing number of hours in a week, fulfils its aims only partly. Physical passivity symptoms are present also here. That is why it is so important to notice negative aspects of physical passivity. The authors present the meaning of imitative forms, also called technical forms, in the perspectiveof anthropological theory of consumption, theory of physical education, sociology of physical culture and humanist theory of far eastern martial arts. They are practiced for health and fitness, for self-defensive skills or as and effect of fascination of the culture of the East which is alwaysvery beneficial as a way of constant care for psychophysical fitness.Imitative forms are one of the ways of counteracting physical passivity among the youngsters. Practicing forms originating from classical martial arts is associated with the ethics of the way of self-perfection and non-aggression. They may be practiced by oneself, at suitable pace, best in the open air. In order to pass proper skills and knowledge to children, the classes of imitativeforms should be first introduced into the curricula of physical education and teachers’ colleges and university courses.


Key words: consumer civilisation, martial arts, physical culture, physical inactivity, society