2015, Volume 11, Issue 1

Effect of type of static exercise and whole body vibration frequency on oxygen consumption and respiratory activity in young and middle-aged women



Wiktor Niewiadomski1, Anna Strasz1, Anna Mróz2, Dorota Laskowska1, Józef Langfort3, Anna Gąsiorowska4

1Department of Applied Physiology, Mossakowski Medical Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw, Poland, Poland
2Department of Physiology, Józef Piłsudski University of Physical Education, Warsaw, Poland, Poland
3Department of Experimental Pharmacology, Mossakowski Medical Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw, Poland, Poland
4Laboratory of Preclinical Studies in Neurodegenerative Diseases, Nencki Institute of Experimental Biology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw, Poland, Poland


Author for correspondence: Anna Gąsiorowska; Laboratory of Preclinical Studies in Neurodegenerative Diseases, Nencki Institute of Experimental Biology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw, Poland, Poland; email: anigas[at]wp.pl


Full text

Abstract

Background and Study Aim: A significant increase in oxygen consumption noted during whole body vibration (WBV) training gave rise to the notion that the latter may be a form of endurance training. However, this applies to exercise exceeding 300 s. Since consumption ramped up during the exercise, we wanted to know whether short, 30 s exercise also causes a significant increase in, and whether vibration frequency, type of exercise, and age influence, oxygen consumption.
Material and Methods: Seven young and five middle-aged women each performed five different static exercises at vibration frequencies of 0, 20, 30, and 40 Hz. Each 30 s exercise was followed by at least 1 min of rest. Oxygen consumption and respiratory function were measured breath by breath.
Results: Specific oxygen consumption and minute ventilation increased slightly but significantly with vibration frequency, and were influenced by the type of exercise. The effect of age was evident only in the respiratory response. The increase in vibration frequency was accompanied by an increase in tidal volume in young women, and by an increase in respiratory frequency in middle-aged women.
Conclusions: As the oxygen consumption increase caused by vibration exercises was small, regarding WBV as an endurance exercise does not seem justified. We hypothesize that the small increase in oxygen consumption observed for a typical WBV protocol was due to the brevity of the single exercise, and possibly depends on the duration of pauses between exercises; manipulation of the exercise protocol allows one to influence oxygen consumption.


Key words: endurance training, exercise physiology, training design, vibration training