2014, Volume 10, Issue 1

Changes in body composition, anthropometric indicators and maximal strength due to weight reduction in judo



Klára Coufalová1, Darryl James Cochrane2, Tomáš Malý1, Jan Heller1

1Faculty of Physical Education and Sport, Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic
2School of Sport and Exercise, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand


Author for correspondence: Klára Coufalová; Faculty of Physical Education and Sport, Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic; email: coufalova[at]ftvs.cuni.cz


Full text

Abstract

Background and Study Aim: The pre-competitive weight reduction is very common in combat sports and it can have negative impact not only on performance but also on health. The purpose of this study was the knowledge about the impact weight reduction pre-competitive judo on indicators of body composition, anthropometric variables and maximum isometric strength. The purpose of this study was to know about the effects of weight reduction pre-competitive judo on indicators of body composition, anthropometric variables and maximum isometric strength.
Material and Methods: Nine national level Czech judoists (mean age 22.3 ± 2.4 years) from five weight categories (except category -100 and +100) took part in this study. Body composition was measured by bioelectrical impedance and anthropometrical indicators from skinfold thickness and body circumferences. Maximal isometric strength was assessed in upper and lower extremities, trunk and handgrip. All participants were assessed before reduction and then in the last day of body weight reduction. These two occasions were 5 days apart.
Results: A reduction of body weight of 4.6% (an average 3.4 kg) was observed with the greatest changes were detected in the fat free mass (FFM) and total body water (TBW). No significant change in body fat was detected. Weight reduction was also reflected in changes of skinfold thickness and body circumferences. A significant decrease in maximal trunk strength was observed, but the weight reduction did not affect the maximal isometric strength of upper or lower extremities.
Conclusions: Ideally, athletes should reduce body fat without decreasing skeletal musculature. Although we didn’t find any significant decrease of maximal isometric strength, we suppose that strength endurance can be greatly influenced.


Key words: bioimpedance analysis, body weight loss, maximal isometric strength, skinfold thickness