2012, Volume 8, Issue 2

Reliability in kimono grip strength tests and comparison between elite and non-elite Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu players



Bruno Victor Corrêa da Silva1, Moacir Marocolo Junior2, Mário Antônio de Moura Simim1, Fernando Nazário Rezende1, Emerson Franchini3, Gustavo Ribeiro de Mota2

1Master Science student of Post-Graduation Program in Physical Education, Federal University of Triângulo Mineiro, Uberaba, MG, Brazil
2Department of Sport Sciences, Post-Graduation Program in Physical Education, Federal University of Triângulo Mineiro, Uberaba, MG, Brazil
3Martial Arts and Combat Sports Research Group, School of Physical Education and Sport, University of Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil


Author for correspondence: Gustavo Ribeiro de Mota; Department of Sport Sciences, Post-Graduation Program in Physical Education, Federal University of Triângulo Mineiro, Uberaba, MG, Brazil; email: grmotta[at]gmail.com


Full text

Abstract

Background and Study Aim: The grip strength endurance is important for Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu (BJJ). Thus, the aims of this study were: a) to test the reliability of two kimono grip strength tests named maximum static lift (MSL) and maximum number of repetitions (MNR) and b) to examine differences between elite and non-elite BJJ players in these tests.
Material and Methods: Thirty BJJ players participated into two phases: “A” to test reliability and “B” to compare elite and non-elite. In phase A, twenty participants performed the MSL and, 15 min later, the MNR in two occasions with 24-h interval. In phase B, ten other BJJ practitioners (non-elite) and ten athletes (elite) performed the same tests. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) two way fixed model (3,1), Bland-Altman plot and the limits of agreement were used to test reliability, correlation between the tests were evaluated by Pearson correlations and independent T test (P<0.05) was utilized to compare elite vs non-elite.
Results: The ICC was high for repeated measurements on different days of phase A (MSL: r = 0.99 and MNR: r = 0.97). Limits of agreement for time of suspension were -6.9 to 2.4-s, with a mean difference of -2.3s (CI: -3.3 to -1.2-s), while for number of repetitions the limits of agreement were -2.9 to 2.3-rep, with a mean difference of -0.3-rep (CI: -0.9 to 0.3-rep). In phase B, elite presented better performance for both tests (P<0.05) compared to non-elite (56±10-s vs 37±11-s in MSL and 15±4-rep vs 8±3-rep in MNR). Moderate correlation were found between MSL and MNR for absolute values during test (r = 0.475; p = 0.034), and retest phases (r = 0.489; p = 0.029), while moderate and high correlations in the test (r = 0.615; p = 0.004) and retest phases (r = 0.716; p = 0.001) were found for relative values, respectively.
Conclusions: These proposed tests are reliable and both static and dynamic grip strength endurance tests seem to differentiate BJJ athletes from different levels.


Key words: athletes, exercise movement techniques, muscle endurance, physical assessment, tournament fights