2015, Volume 11, Issue 1

The level of physical activity of the working inhabitants of Warsaw practising martial arts and combat sports



Elżbieta Biernat1, Dariusz Boguszewski2

1College of the Global Economy, Department of Tourism, Warsaw School of Economics, Warsaw, Poland
2Physiotherapy Division, Rehabilitation Department, Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland


Author for correspondence: Elżbieta Biernat; College of the Global Economy, Department of Tourism, Warsaw School of Economics, Warsaw, Poland; email: elzbieta.biernat[at]sgh.waw.pl


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Abstract

Background and Study Aim: Martial arts and combat sports are a worldwide popular form of exercise. They are trained professionally as well as recreationally. They lead to self-improvement and supporting physical fitness. The aim of the study was relationships between professional and amateur inhabitants of Warsaw practicing martial arts and combat sports training and the level of physical activity.
Material and Methods: There were 157 persons practicing martial arts and combat sports who partook in the research. They were selected from the group of inhabitants of Warsaw aged 15-69 years (n=6547) working in public institutes or learning/studying in Varsovian schools/colleges (academies, schools, theatres, offices, councils, town halls, hypermarkets, shops, hospitals, clinics and scientific departments). The investigative tools were two questionnaires: IPAQ and author′s one (by means of which biometrical data and the information on the subject of places and the character of practiced martial art and sport was collected). For the statistical elaboration the Chi-square test and Tukey Honest Significant Difference (HSD) tests were used.
Results: The studied persons most often (p<0.05) were characterized with the moderate (56.1%) level of physical activity. The highest fraction of persons with high level of physical activity was noted among those training professionally (24.6%), though there was no essential difference in this regard among those exercising recreationally. It was inverse in the case of the low level which relatively more often (p<0.05) referred to those undertaking martial arts and combat sports during their free time (35.0%). The entire weekly energy input of persons practicing martial arts and combat sports recreationally (1700.6±2728.3 MET-min/week) indeed differed (p<0.05) from the energy-expense of persons training professionally (2825.9±2569.1 MET-min/week).
Conclusions: The level of physical activity of Varsovians practicing martial arts and combat sports is in the vast majority sufficient for maintaining health. The character of trainings is a factor which conditions the lack of fulfilment of WHO norms.


Key words: amateur sport, health prophylaxis, professional sport