2018, Volume 14

Techniques and tactics from medal-winning men’s and women’s national teams in the 16th World Kendo Championships



Yukiko Takami1, Mitsuru Nakamura2, Takamitsu Iwamoto3, Tatsuya Ohno1, Ken-ichiro Mutoh4, Mayumi Otsuka5

1Faculty of Health and Sports Science, Juntendo University, Japan, Chiba
2Graduate School of Health and Sports Science, Juntendo University, Japan, Chiba
3Faculty of International Management, Beppu University, Japan, Oita
4Faculty of Science and Technology, Seikei University, Japan, Tokyo
5School of Physical Education, Tokai University, Japan, Kanagawa


Author for correspondence: Yukiko Takami; Faculty of Health and Sports Science, Juntendo University, Japan; email: y-takami@juntendo.ac.jp


Abstract

Background and Study Aim: Although kendo is increasingly being practised worldwide, few studies have compared methods and techniques used by practitioners in different countries, except for some studies that focused on Japan and Korea. The current research is highlighting prevailing techniques by athletes from different countries. Application aim is to support an expansion of the kendo.

Material and Methods: DVDs containing video of 240 matches among competitors from five countries that represent the podium winners in both the men’s and women’s categories of the 16th World Kendo Championship Tournament were used in this study. The researchers classified all of the effective strikes into the following categories: (1) major technique classifications (2) datotsu-bui (3) technique sub-categories. Chi-square tests were used to compare the usage frequencies of the different techniques analysed in the study between men and women and the respective countries included in the study.

Results: No significant differences in technical manoeuvres used by men and women competitors were found. There were also no significant differences between the ratios of effective strikes or thrusts between men’s competitors from the four countries studied. The effective strike ratios of Korea and Brazil differed from those of Japan and the USA in women.

Conclusions: There are differences in how men and women practice kendo due to differences in physical characteristics, but none was found. Among women kendo practitioners, some differences in skills among different countries were identified. The findings of the current research will aid in the dissemination of kendo globally.


Key words: striking zones, skill, kendo matches, competition analysis


Cite this article as:

AMA:

Takami Y, Nakamura M, Iwamoto T et al. Techniques and tactics from medal-winning men’s and women’s national teams in the 16th World Kendo Championships. ARCH BUDO. 2018;14

APA:

Takami, Y., Nakamura, M., Iwamoto, T., Ohno, T., Mutoh, K., & Otsuka, M. (2018). Techniques and tactics from medal-winning men’s and women’s national teams in the 16th World Kendo Championships. ARCH BUDO, 14

Chicago:

Takami, Yukiko, Nakamura Mitsuru, Iwamoto Takamitsu, Ohno Tatsuya, Mutoh Ken-ichiro, Otsuka Mayumi. 2018. "Techniques and tactics from medal-winning men’s and women’s national teams in the 16th World Kendo Championships". ARCH BUDO 14

Harvard:

Takami, Y., Nakamura, M., Iwamoto, T., Ohno, T., Mutoh, K., and Otsuka, M. (2018). Techniques and tactics from medal-winning men’s and women’s national teams in the 16th World Kendo Championships. ARCH BUDO, 14

MLA:

Otsuka, Mayumi et al. "Techniques and tactics from medal-winning men’s and women’s national teams in the 16th World Kendo Championships." ARCH BUDO, vol. 14, 2018

Vancouver:

Takami Y, Nakamura M, Iwamoto T et al. Techniques and tactics from medal-winning men’s and women’s national teams in the 16th World Kendo Championships. ARCH BUDO 2018; 14