2021, Volume 17

The effects of judo therapy in patients with mental disorders



Kazuhiro Nakamura1, Teruo Hayashi2, Masanobu Wada3, Maja Sori Doval4, Tadashi Nishikawa2

1Faculty of Economics, University of Fukuyama, Fukuyama-city, Japan
2Psychiatry, Nishikawa Hospital, Hamada-city, Japan
3Graduate School of Integrated Arts and Sciences, University of Hiroshima, Higashihiroshima-city, Japan
4Faculty of Arts and Sciences, University of Tsuda, Mitaka-city, Japan


Author for correspondence: Kazuhiro Nakamura; Faculty of Economics, University of Fukuyama, Fukuyama-city, Japan; email: kaznaka@fukuyama-u.ac.jp


Abstract

Background and Study Aims: As a sport that requires technical and physical skills training, judo develops logical thinking and mental strength, as well as contributes to psychosocial development. Judo has been introduced in therapy aimed at patients with mental disorders and intellectual disability. However, the usefulness and effects of judo therapy have not been enough scientifically evaluated. The aim of this study is knowledge about the effects of judo therapy in the rehabilitation of patients with mental disorders, focusing on the psychosocial domains of subjective well-being and quality of life.

Material and Methods: Of the 34 participants, 20 underwent judo therapy (12 times over a six-month period), and 14 were followed up as controls. We measured changes in subjective psychosocial domains using the Subjective Well-being Inventory (SUBI) and Japanese version of the Questionnaire about the Process of Recovery.

Results: Two-way ANOVA revealed a statistically significant effect of group (i.e. control vs. judo) as well as of the group × period interaction in SUBI sub-items of self-confidence and sense of accomplishment. Post-hoc tests showed significantly higher scores for these SUBI sub-items after 6 and/or 12 times of judo therapy. We found a significant effect of the group only in the sub-item ‘acceptance of the illness’.

Conclusions: Judo therapy enabled considerably fast improvement in the self-confidence and sense of accomplishment of patients. Our results contribute to the development of the quantitative evaluation of judo therapy. Multi-centre, long-term follow-up studies are required to formulate the structure of effective judo therapy that is applicable to a wide variety of clinical settings.


Key words: ADHD, depression, dissociative disorder, epilepsy, mental health, psychiatric rehabilitation, schizophrenia, subjective well-being


Cite this article as:

AMA:

Nakamura K, Hayashi T, Wada M et al. The effects of judo therapy in patients with mental disorders. ARCH BUDO. 2021;17

APA:

Nakamura, K., Hayashi, T., Wada, M., Sori Doval, M., & Nishikawa, T. (2021). The effects of judo therapy in patients with mental disorders. ARCH BUDO, 17

Chicago:

Nakamura, Kazuhiro, Hayashi Teruo, Wada Masanobu, Sori Doval Maja, Nishikawa Tadashi. 2021. "The effects of judo therapy in patients with mental disorders". ARCH BUDO 17

Harvard:

Nakamura, K., Hayashi, T., Wada, M., Sori Doval, M., and Nishikawa, T. (2021). The effects of judo therapy in patients with mental disorders. ARCH BUDO, 17

MLA:

Nakamura, Kazuhiro et al. "The effects of judo therapy in patients with mental disorders." ARCH BUDO, vol. 17, 2021

Vancouver:

Nakamura K, Hayashi T, Wada M et al. The effects of judo therapy in patients with mental disorders. ARCH BUDO 2021; 17