2022, Volume 18

Cyberbullying and interpersonal aggression as a public health problem – for the consideration of educators and tutors



Adam Podolski1, Krystyna Forystek1, Kinga Kania1

1College of Humanities, Institute of Pedagogy, University of Rzeszow, Rzeszow, Poland


Author for correspondence: Adam Podolski; College of Humanities, Institute of Pedagogy, University of Rzeszow, Rzeszow, Poland



Abstract

Apart from real violence, virtual violence (also known as cyberbullying) has recently appeared. This phenomenon is a derivative of the remarkable technological progress and easier access to the Internet especially for children and young people. The aim of this paper is the authors' reflection on the issue of cyberbullying and interpersonal aggression, as exemplified by Polish experiences.

Cyberbullying is the act of harassing, bullying or terrorising a weaker person. Electronic bullying at school is behaviour of a student or a group of students to exclude the victim from the group. It is long-lasting and negative. Cyberbullying is such a common form of violence that it functions in legislation and is considered as stalking in a new form. Both perpetrators and victims of cyberbullying are most often children and teenagers attending school (they are the most active groups in the virtual space).

Although the phenomenon of interpersonal aggression has been inscribed in the history of mankind since time began, the infamous popularity of its intensification is rightly associated with the negative effects of watching television by children. The effects are much more extensive and go beyond the deterioration of mental health (increasing aggressiveness and the expansion of brutality in various aspects as well as rudeness, insolence, intolerance, etc.), as they affect somatic health (e.g. vision defects, degeneration of the spine and musculoskeletal system) and social health (especially limiting interpersonal relations with peers and in a family life, reducing the positive reception and expression of feelings, etc.).

Therefore, from the point of view of prophylaxis and therapy, detailed methods, forms and means of innovative agonology are attention-grabbing. Although to some extent they are known to teachers of various specialties, psychologists, physiotherapists, modern adaptations combined with unique solutions make this system not only an attractive pedagogical and educational challenge, but also effective and safe, e.g.: art therapy, fun forms of martial arts, honourable self-defence, martial arts bibliotherapy, music therapy with martial arts.


Key words: diagnosing aggressiveness, innovative agonology, fun forms of martial arts, mental health, honourable self-defence, music therapy with martial arts, non-apparatus test, violence


Cite this article as:

AMA:

Podolski A, Forystek K, Kania K. Cyberbullying and interpersonal aggression as a public health problem – for the consideration of educators and tutors. ARCH BUDO. 2022;18

APA:

Podolski, A., Forystek, K., & Kania, K. (2022). Cyberbullying and interpersonal aggression as a public health problem – for the consideration of educators and tutors. ARCH BUDO, 18

Chicago:

Podolski, Adam, Forystek Krystyna, Kania Kinga. 2022. "Cyberbullying and interpersonal aggression as a public health problem – for the consideration of educators and tutors". ARCH BUDO 18

Harvard:

Podolski, A., Forystek, K., and Kania, K. (2022). Cyberbullying and interpersonal aggression as a public health problem – for the consideration of educators and tutors. ARCH BUDO, 18

MLA:

Podolski, Adam et al. "Cyberbullying and interpersonal aggression as a public health problem – for the consideration of educators and tutors." ARCH BUDO, vol. 18, 2022

Vancouver:

Podolski A, Forystek K, Kania K. Cyberbullying and interpersonal aggression as a public health problem – for the consideration of educators and tutors. ARCH BUDO 2022; 18